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Did you know that Pleasant Grove was once called Battle Creek?




CITY CLEAN UP DAYS


Pleasant Grove City Clean Up Days are Sat, May 9th through Sat, May 16th, from 8am - 8pm at the OLD PIPE PLANT (400 N. 350 W.). This is for the Residents of Pleasant Grove City to help in disposing of their garbage from their yard and home. Please dump in the appropriate dumpster. There will be a PG City Employee to assist you as needed.


No hazardous materials, Paint, Tires, Cement, Televisions, Computers, Electronics or Chemicals will be accepted. Green waste must be clean with no garbage mixed in with it. There will be no dumping before or after hours. We appreciate all the work you do to keep Pleasant Grove a beautiful community.


Any questions please contact the Pleasant Grove City Public Works Department at 801 - 785 - 2941.





Water Conservation Awareness and Education Plan (PDF)


PLEASANT GROVE CITY WATER MANAGEMENT ANDCONSERVATION PLAN


INTRODUCTION


Pleasant Grove City has developed this Water Management and Conservation Plan to meet the requirements of the Utah Water Conservation Plan Act (UC 73-10-32). It was also developed to help the City address its water needs now and in the future.

Pleasant Grove City has designated the Public Works Director at its water conservation coordinator.


DESCRIPTION OF PLEASANT GROVE CITY AND ITS WATER SYSTEM


Prior to the advent of the Mormon pioneers in Utah, there were very few Europeans who had entered the Utah Valley. It was not until 1847 that the valley was really considered for communities.


Soon after the pioneers entered Utah, Brigham Young sent an exploration party to Utah Valley to locate suitable places for settlements. The men stopped at several sites until reaching a beautiful grove of cottonwood trees bordering a clear stream (Grove Creek). After scouting around, they decided that this was a choice location and staked out a town site. Their glowing report of ample water supplies, fertile soil, grass for pasturing cattle, and plentiful fish and game brought the first permanent settlers to the site in September, 1850.


Because of Indian trouble, the pioneers built a fort and constructed the first water system which was nothing more than a box flume carrying pure mountain water by each home. At each home there was an opening in the flume where a cover could be lifted and water dipped out and the cover immediately replaced to keep the water clean and pure. This system evolved into the current ditch irrigation system that is used for agricultural and some residential landscaping. This system is owned and operated by the Pleasant Grove Irrigation Company.


Since that time, the City developed a pressurized culinary water system to supply the indoor needs of its residents. This system also serves residential landscape irrigation for those who do not have access to Pleasant Grove Irrigation Company water. Water for this system is supplied by several springs and wells.


The City has also constructed a pressurized secondary irrigation system for non-culinary uses within the City. This system currently serves most of the City’s major water users and approximately 90 percent of the City’s residential users.

The assets of the former Manila Culinary Water Company have recently been split between Cedar Hills City and Pleasant Grove City. Pleasant Grove City currently serves the culinary and secondary needs of nearly all its residents. The exceptions are a few served by private wells, a few homes served by Cedar Hills City by agreement, and some irrigation company shareholders. This Conservation Plan covers all water users within Pleasant Grove City.


Inventory of Water Resources


Pleasant Grove City’s culinary water is obtained from three springs and ten wells. Table 1 shows the sources, their capacity, and their associated primary water right numbers. The City’s secondary water is obtained from two wells and surface water from shares owned in various water companies. The City rents varying amounts of additional irrigation company shares each year to supplement their secondary supply. Table 2 shows the secondary sources and associated information. The City owns various additional water rights that can be utilized in both the culinary and secondary irrigation systems.



Table Culinary Water Sources


Source

Capacity (gpm)

Primary Water Right Number

Battle Creek Springs

995

55-30

Wade Springs

450

55-4161

Battle Creek Well

1,346

55-5642

Grove Creek Well

650

55-977

Monson Well

1,037

55-704

Anderson Park Well

1,346

55-976

Brimley Well

2,692

55-741

Ekins Well

450

55-793

Gibson Well

3,200

55-793

Adams Well

550

55-4461

Peterson Well

1,200

55-1170

Atwood Well

625

55-710

Wadley Spring

120

55-657




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